Sunday, November 20, 2011

St. Columba (South Dakota) Parish Church Registry 1881-1927 - C Surnames

I have come into the possession of a copy of a Church Registry for St. Columba Parish, South Dakota that includes the baptism, marriage, first communion, confirmation, and death records for the Yankton townships of Walshtown, Mayfield, Idylwilde, Jamesville (Sigel) from 1881 through 1927.  The entire list of surnames posted to date can be found here.  If any of these names belong to you, let me know and I will gladly forward a copy of it to you.



Last Name
First Name
Page
Comments
Calligan
Alfred Tom
22
Campion
Alice Elizabeth
16
Campion
Ann Elizabeth
58
(m. Fitzgerald)
Campion
Earl Sylvester
42
Campion
Eugene Edward
11
Campion
James
36
Campion
Jeremias
56
(m. Tadt)
Campion
John Ransom
57
(m. Tadt)
Campion
John
31
Campion
John
32
Campion
John
53
(m. Noonan)
Campion
Margaret
7
Campion
Margaret Mary
20
Campion
Mary Loretto
27
Campion
William James
11
Carlin
Edward James
11
Christopher
Clara Theresia
14
Christopher
Ellen
60
(m. Fitzgerald)
Christopher
James Francis
23
Christopher
Margaret
28
Christopher
Mary Elizabeth
7
Connelly
Patrick
56
(m. Peterson)
Cook
Maud
58
(m. Slowey)
Cook
Maud Mary
36
Cooney
James Leo
5
Cooney
William
51
(m. McGee)
Cooney
William J.
55
(m. Meloy)
Cramer
John
9
Cunningham
Catharine Agnes
7
Cunningham
Elisabeth
10


Friday, November 18, 2011

St. Columba Parish (South Dakota) Church Registry 1881-1927 - B Surnames

I have come into the possession of a copy of a Church Registry for St. Columba Parish, South Dakota that includes the baptism, marriage, first communion, confirmation, and death records for the Yankton townships of Walshtown, Mayfield, Idylwilde, Jamesville (Sigel) from 1881 through 1927.  If any of these names belong to you, let me know and I will gladly forward a copy of it to you.



Last Name
First Name
Page
Comments
Bailey
George
51
Bartosh
Ann Bertha
8
Bartosh
Magdalen
57
(m. Schweitzer)
Bartosh
Magdalen
19
Bartosh
Mary Katherine
15
Bauer
Anna
59
(m. Dangel)
Bauer
Bridget
17
Bauer
Bridget
61
(m. Anderson)
Bauer
Caecilia
30
Bauer
Catherine
57
(m. Dangel)
Beddow
William C.
60
(m. McGillick)
Berberic

Gerhardt Francis Joseph
29
Berseth
Adam
12
Bickelmeier
Carl John
18
Bicklmeier
Mary
55
(m. Zicelsberger)
Birge
Thomas
3
Boyle
Lucy
51
(m. Mines)
Branch
Edward Francis
17
Bruchlaches
Eva Grace
49
Bruchlacher
Laura Marie
47
Bruchlacher
Mary Florence
48
Buchanan
John Ransom
51
(m. Gallagher)
Buck
Mary Ann
5
Buck
Teresa
3
Burns
Teresia
52
(m. Slowey)


I will be posting the index to this Registry in this and future posts.

Monday, November 14, 2011

Louis Lanctot's Date of Death - A Research Log


This is me, still playing catch-up with my research logs.  If anyone sees anything I missed or any flaws in my analysis, please let me know.

Subject Name:  Louis Phelisa Lanctot, b. 17 Sep 1888 d. Oct 1922

Question to be researchedWhen did Louis die?

Date of Search:  11.10.11


Place Searched:  Yankton Cemetery, Yankton, South Dakota, headstone

Results:  Shows Louis P. Lanctot’s death year as 1922.


Place Searched:  Note attached to transcribed obituary – unknown date – from Josephine Lanctot, daughter of Louis Lanctot.

Results:  “Was killed when a truck loaded with lumber turned over and pinned him underneath.  The truck belonged to a neighboring homesteader in Casper, Wyoming.  They were hauling lumber to build the homestead for his mother, as time was running out to get her house built to secure the homestead claim.  It is unclear that they ever told her that it was her lumber.  The truck came around a curve and met another vehicle with bright lights, which blinded the driver.  Louis was in the back of the truck (the cabs weren't big enough for 3 in those days).  They thought Louis had tried to jump out of the truck, but his coattail caught on the lumber and it threw him under the truck.  His neck was broken and the hub of the wheel rested on his temple.”


Place Searched:  Entry for the “History of Yankton County” submitted by Josephine Lanctot Swift – unknown date – written as short biography of Louis P. Lanctot and Alice M. Schneider.

Results:  States that Louis “lost his life in an automobile accident near Casper.”


Place Searched:  Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records (http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=862804&docClass=SER&sid=qhz5sshl.myy)

Results:  Land patent #862804 for 320 acres dated 17 May 1922.


Place Searched:  Transcribed obituary for Louis Lanctot – October 1922 – presumably published in the Yankton Press & Dakotan.

Results:  “Louis P. Lanctot, formerly of Yankton, was instantly killed near Casper, Wyo., Saturday afternoon, when a heavy auto truck, loaded with lumber turned over pinning him underneath.”


Place Searched:  Louis Lanctot, death certificate 1922-1666 (21 October 1922), Bureau of VItal Statistics, Wyoming State Archives, Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Results:  Death certificate gives date of death as 21 October 1922 at 10:00 p.m. at Wyoming Medical Center as a result of a fracture at the base of the skull caused by truck overturning.


Analysis:  All sources agree that Louis died in 1922, probably October.  The land records show that it was obviously after May 17, 1922.  Unfortunately, none of the secondary sources provide a date within the month of October.  Therefore, (obviously) my most reliable source for the death date is the death certificate itself.


Conclusion:  Louis P. Lanctot died on 21 October 1922 at 10:00 p.m. in Casper, Wyoming.          


Next Steps:  I would still like to have a copy of the actual obituary to confirm the details of his death (the story given by Aunt Jo doesn't quite match the cause of death on the certificate).  The volunteer at the Wyoming State Archives did not find any mention of the wreck or Louis’ death in the Wyoming papers.  I will write to the Yankton Press & Dakotan to see if they still have the obituary among their archives.

Saturday, November 12, 2011

Georgia Family History Expo - Day Two

I got a relaxing start to Day Two with a nice breakfast at the hotel and a nice, leisurely stroll through the book vendors.  I bought a couple of books and headed toward the blogger's table.  I had no sooner walked into the area when I was forced to pose for a photo (for the record, I'm usually allergic to cameras, but I think these ladies are pretty cool, so I made the sacrifice):
L to R: Me, Ruby Craft, Valerie Craft, DearMYRTLE, Linda McCauley, and Tonia Kendrick
At 10 a.m., we headed to our sessions.  Here are the sessions I decided to take today:


The Tired, the Poor, the Huddled Masses and the Wretched Refuse: U.S. Immigration from 1820 to 1954 (Joan Healey, A.G., FamilySearch)
This was a beginner course, but I really needed some answers about Canadian border crossings, which I got.  I wasn't pleased.  Turns out that no border crossing records exist before  1895, and no records for Canadian border crossings before 1906.  The ones I need are from 1875, so I'm out of luck.


The Campaigns Forgotten: American Wars After the American Revolution and Before the Civil War Record (Robert S. Davis, M.Ed., M.A.)
The focus was on the Indian Wars, War of 1812, more Indian Wars, and the War with Mexico.  I haven't found any direct ancestors in any of these wars, but I'm so glad I went to this class anyway.  Mr. Davis is such a wonderful speaker and really knows his stuff!  He was so full of useful information ... and it was all in his head.  I can't even imagine what that's like.


After lunch, I went to my next two classes.  They go together, so I'm lumping them into one item:


Google Earth for Genealogy - Rock Your Ancestor's World (Lisa Louise Cooke, GenealogyGems) and
How to Create Awesome Interactive Family History Tours with Google Earth (Lisa Louise Cooke, GenealogyGems)
This class was fascinating!  I had used Google Earth a little, but after this class I realized I was only using a small percentage of it's full capacity.  Let's just say that the things Lisa showed us we can do with Google Earth were AMAZING!  So amazing, in fact, that between classes, there was a mob of people at her booth to purchase her CDs and Google Toolbox book.  I managed to get a set of CDs before she sold out (whew!)  I can't wait to get started with my new toy!


It's always a sign of a good conference when you leave with twice as much stuff as you came with.  Logic dictates that this must have been a good conference.  Look at the new stuff I got today!
BCG Genealogical Standards Manual, Genealogy Gems 1st Season book, Google Earth for Genealogy (Vols. I and II), and History of South Dakota (c) 1968
Plus, I made 5 new friends!  Nothing beats that ... AND I won another prize!!
You can't really tell from the photo, but there's a sparkly picture frame, a cute little pencil and lots of sticky arrows!
Overall, today was also a great day.  My brain is so full now I'm afraid it will pop!  I have decided that I need to start buying lottery tickets so I'll have time to work with all this new information without a pesky job getting in the way.


Kudos to Holly Hansen and all the folks at Family History Expos for organizing another great conference!  Nothing is final yet, but it looks like the Georgia Family History Expo will be on November 9-10 next year, same bat place, same bat channel.

Friday, November 11, 2011

Georgia Family History Expo 2011 - Day One

I made the decision to travel to the Expo this morning because registration didn't start until 1 p.m. I arrived in Duluth around 10:15 and grabbed breakfast at Chick-fil-A (I love Chick-fil-A, but never get a craving until Sunday when they're closed, so this was a special treat for me). And this is what makes CFA so awesome: as I was leaving, one of the servers asked if I would like a refill of my sweet tea to go. Well, of course I would! Sweet tea runs through my veins! She must have seen it in my eyes, and I didn't even have to ask!


So, a chicken biscuit and 45 minutes later, I headed over to Gwinnett Center for the Expo. I found a warm spot indoors to wait out the next 2 hours and try to make some final decisions on what sessions I would attend. 


Incidentally, after I got registered and spent some money on some books, I ran into fellow Geneabloggers DearMYRTLE, Linda McCauley (a Blogger of Honor), Valerie Craft, and Tonia Kendrick; as well as Valerie's mom Ruby and Linda's 23-and-Me cousin Christa.  I also ran into Kathy, a fellow member of the Delta Genealogical Society.


There were so many choices for classes, it was difficult to choose! This is how it ultimately turned out: 


The Power of DNA in Unlocking Family Relationships (Anna Swayne, GeneTree)
I've heard about a lot of people using DNA as a research tool, but never quite understood how it could help except in a very broad sense.  After this class, I not only have a better understanding of how it works (thanks to Anna for taking the time to explain it to me with colorful pictures and stuff), but also how it can help my research - particularly where my adopted grandfather is concerned!  (Heads up, family -- I'll be calling on you very soon!)


Census Techniques and Strategies for Finding Elusive Ancestors (Joan E. Healey, AG, FamilySearch) 
I really didn't need this class except as a refresher.  We learned the several reasons why a person can't be found on the census, and ways to get around them.  So basically, unless your person didn't exist or the census records don't exist, you should be able to find them by the time you employ all of these techniques!


How to Plan and Organize a Family History Book (Biff & Nancy Barnes, Stories to Tell Books) 
I didn't think I was anywhere near ready to start writing a book about my family history yet, but I just might be closer than I thought!  Biff & Nancy did a great job explaining the different ways to present your history and how to determine whether you have enough information to get started.  I'm feeling very motivated now ... I'm going to need another to-do list.


The Clothesline Approach to Documentation and Analysis (DearMYRTLE)
This was probably the most interesting concept on analysis I've seen yet.  Leave it to Ol' Myrt to put an interesting spin on such a mundane task.  I can't wait to get home and put this technique to the test.  It should really help out while I'm creating my research logs!  In case you're wondering ... here's how my notes looked:

I was so jealous of Laura when she won the big prize at the FGS conference in Springfield.  But turnabout is fair play.  I'm a winner too!  Take a look:
Seriously though ... after day one, I finally got back to my hotel room with a pile of loot that would make Cap'n Jack Sparrow jealous:
It would have been perfect, except that I realized I forgot my pajamas.  Good thing I won a t-shirt.  It was a long day, but tons of fun.  I can't wait to get up and do it all again tomorrow!

Louis Lanctot's Date of Birth - an update

I first posted my Research Log for Louis Lanctot here.  Since then, I received a copy of his death certificate from Natrona County, Wyoming.


I need to take a moment here and give a big thumbs up to the Wyoming State Archives, particularly Wanda (a research volunteer).  I sent an email on Monday (11/7) to see if Louis' death certificate existed, and the cost to obtain a copy.  In less than 48 hours, I had a digital copy of the death certificate in my inbox with a note from Wanda stating that she had also looked for a newspaper article about Louis' death (more on that in a minute), but wasn't able to find one.  The best part?  NO CHARGE FOR THE CERTIFICATE!  We now refer to Wanda as "Ms. Awesome" in my house.


Okay, back to regularly-scheduled programming ...




So this isn't as much of an "update" as I hoped.  Louis' death certificate shows his birth date as 17 Sept 1877.  Ten years before any other mention of his birth.  It is obviously wrong because he is listed as being 35 years old.  If he had been born in 1877, he would have been 45 years old.  Clearly, this is not a big help as far as narrowing down his birth date is concerned.


However, now that I know his date of death, I can (hopefully) locate his obituary.


You'll notice that his cause of death is "fracture at base of skull caused by truck overturning."  Here's the story I was told by my grand aunt, Josephine -- Aunt Jo -- (Louis' daughter) before she died in 2009 [she would have been 5 years old at the time of his death]:
The truck did not belong to Dad, it belonged to a neighboring homesteader.  Still another neighbor wanted to ride along.  The trucks in that era did not have cabs wide enough for three men so Dad rode on the back.  Grandma Lanctot [Eliza Bourke] had filed for homestead land and time was running out for her to get her house built.  Dad had been over and dug the basement on her land and the lumber was to build her house.  I don't know if anyone ever told her the lumber was for her house.  The cause of the accident -- they came around a curve in the road and met a car with bright lights which blinded the truck driver.  They thought Dad tried to jump and his coattail caught on the lumber and threw him under.  His neck was broken and the hub of the wheel rested on his temple.
 Obviously, her facts were a little skewed, but she had the general idea of how he was killed.  This is the first ancestor I've run across who did not die of natural causes -- and it makes me a little sad.  He was so young.  My grandfather was only 15 months old when his father died. He never got to know him.  I wonder if that's what caused him to be such a wonderful father and grandfather?


In any case, there is also an address listed for Louis' place of death on the certificate.  I Googled 1249 East 2nd Street, Casper, Wyoming, expecting to see a little grassy area or some farm land.  No.  It's the Wyoming Medical Center.  Apparently folks weren't real keen on following directions back in the day.  See the little blurb about "if death occurred in a Hospital or Institution give its NAME instead of street and number?"  I rest my case.  So it appears that one of two things happened: (1) he died on the scene and was pronounced dead after he got to the hospital; or (2) he lived for a very brief time and died at the hospital.  In either case, I get some comfort in the thought that his pain was not prolonged.


So ... off to find more sources for a birth date.  Again.

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

Harold John Crowe's Date of Birth - A Research Log


This is me, still playing catch-up with my research logs, in an attempt to narrow the search for my great grandfather's birth date without the benefit of a true birth certificate.  If anyone sees anything I missed or any flaws in my analysis, please let me know.
Subject Name:  Harold John Crowe (Sr.), b. ?? d. 19 Sept 1971

Question to be researchedWhen was Harold born?

Date of Search:  11.8.11


Place Searchedancestry.com (1900 Federal Census, Perry Co., IN, Troy Township, ED ED number 116, Sheet 9B, dwelling 179, family 194, Herrold J. Crowe.)

Results:  “Herrold J.” is shown as 8/12 years old, born in Sep 1899 in Indiana.  Census taken on 9 Jun 1900.


Place Searched:  Ancestry.com (1910 Federal Census, Spencer Co., IN, Ohio Township, ED ED number 84, p. 3B-4A, dwelling 72, family 74, Harold Crow.)

ResultsHarold is shown as 10 years old.  Census was taken on 18 Apr 1910, putting Harold’s birth date between 19 Apr 1900 and 17 Apr 1901.


Place Searched:  ancestry.com (1920 United States Federal Census, Posey Co., IN, Ward 1, Black Twp., ED 50, p. 13A-B, lines 44-1, dwelling 325. family 344, Charles Crow.)

Results:  Harold is listed as age 20.  Census was taken on 13-14 Jan 1920, making his date of birth between 15 Jan 1900 and 12 Jan 1901.


Place Searched:  ancestry.com (1930 Federal Census, Marion Co., IN, Center Township, ED number 49-402, p. 23A, dwelling 6, family 7, Harold Crowe.)

Results:  Harold is listed with his wife Lucille at age 30.  Census was taken on 22 Apr 1930, making his date of birth between 23 Apr 1900 and 21 Apr 1901.


Place Searched:  ancestry.com (Harold Crowe Sr, no. xxx-xx-8788, "U.S. Social Security Death Index," ancestry.com.)

Results:  Harold Crowe Sr’s date of birth is given as 15 Sept 1899.


Place SearchedHarold John Crowe Sr, xxx-xx-8788, 1936, Application for Social Security Number, Social Security Administration.

Results:  Birth date is listed as 15 Sep 1899 for Harold John Crowe, Sr.


Place Searched"Funeral Records," Harold J. Crowe; G.H. Hermann Funeral Home, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Results:  Shows Harold J. Crowe’s birth date as 15 Sep 1899.  The informant was Harold Crowe Jr.  A phone call with the woman at the funeral home revealed that the information for the funeral home records was copied directly from the death certificate.


Place SearchedHarold J. Crowe, Indianapolis Star, Indianapolis, Indiana, 20 September 1971, p. 31.

Results:  Obituary lists Harold J. Crowe as age 72.  He died on 19 Sept 1971, and the obituary was published on 20 Sep 1971.  This places his birth year in 1899.


Place Searched(Male) Crow, Perry County, Indiana birth certificate no. 2014034 (15 September 1899)

Results:  Birth certificate shows a male child born to Charles Crow and Ida Gray on 15 Sep 1899.  I can only assume this is Harold.


Analysis:  Census records as a whole are not reliable when it comes to exact dates.  His next oldest sibling is 2-1/2 years older, and his next youngest is 3 years younger.  Since the date on the birth certificate matches the date on his Social Security application, I am going to assume it is the same person.  That information also matches what was given in the funeral records.


Conclusion:  Since I have 3 sources that agree with the birth date of 15 Sep 1899, I am going to assume this is correct.


Next Steps:  I have requested his death certificate, but have not received it.  I have a feeling it will give exactly the same information that the records from the funeral home give.  I also requested his military records from WWI, but received a letter that the records were burned in the 1973 fire, so I am going to have to find a way to reconstruct them.